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The Canadian Anti-Doping Program – September 2006 Abbreviated Therapeutic Use Exemption Guidelines Abbreviated Therapeutic Use Exemption Guidelines
As per the CANADIAN ANTI-DOPING PROGRAM (CADP), Section 1: General Principles, Rule 1.5, “The Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport may issue detailed guidelines or practices for these Rules and Standards from time to time.” These Abbreviated Therapeutic Use Exemption Guidelines are to be used in conjunction with the CADP, Section 5: Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) Rules and were developed to facilitate their administration. Unless otherwise specified, all references within this document are to sections of the CADP. These guidelines are an interpretation of the requirements of the CADP only. Athletes may also be subject to testing outside the scope of the CADP and must be aware of their requirements within their international federation, if any. There are two kinds of TUEs: Abbreviated Therapeutic Use Exemption (ATUE) and Standard Therapeutic Use Exemption (Standard TUE). The scope of this guideline is to address the CADP ATUE process only. All Canadian athletes who require the use of a prohibited method and/or a prohibited substance which is not subject to the ATUE process must apply to the CCES for a Standard TUE, whether they are part of the CCES Registered Testing Pool (RTP) or not. It is acknowledged that some substances included on the Prohibited List are used to treat medical conditions frequently encountered in the athlete population. As such, the following substances are subject to the ATUE process: a) Beta-2 agonists administered by inhalation only (formoterol, salbutamol, salmeterol, and b) Glucocorticosteroids administered by intra-articular and local injections, and by In Canada, beta-2 agonists and/or glucocorticosteroids (administered in the ways described above) are only available to individuals by way of a medical physician’s diagnosis and prescription. Athletes who require the use of these prohibited substances as a result of a medical physician’s diagnosis and prescription outlined in Item 3.1 of this guideline are subject to the ATUE process. The ATUE process varies depending on the athlete’s classification as described below: a) Registered Testing Pool Athletes: a Canadian athlete in the CCES Registered Testing
Pool (RTP) must complete an ATUE form and submit it to the CCES at the time the prohibited substance is prescribed to the athlete by the athlete’s physician, or at the latest 21 days prior to participating in an event. The CCES will only grant approval for use of a prohibited substance subject to the ATUE process once it has received a completed CCES ATUE form for these aforementioned athletes. The Canadian Anti-Doping Program – September 2006 Abbreviated Therapeutic Use Exemption Guidelines b) Canadian International-Level Athletes Who Are Not in the RTP: All Canadian
international-level athletes subject to testing by their international sport federation (IF) (for example by competing in an international competition) must complete an ATUE form and submit it to their IF at the time the prohibited substance is prescribed to the athlete by the athlete’s physician, or at the latest 21 days prior to participating in an event. If it is not possible for a Canadian athlete who is not in the CCES RTP to apply for an ATUE from his/her IF (e.g., if the athlete does not fall within the scope of the IF process, or it the IF does not have a process that complies with the International Standard for TUEs), then the athlete must complete an ATUE form and submit it to the CCES at the time the prohibited substance is prescribed to the athlete by the athlete’s physician, or at the latest 21 days prior to participating in an event. The CCES will only grant approval for use of a prohibited substance subject to the ATUE process once it has received a completed CCES ATUE form for these aforementioned athletes. c) Domestic Athletes: A national athlete who is not in the CCES RTP need not complete an
ATUE form and submit it to the CCES at the time the prohibited substance is prescribed to the athlete by the athlete’s physician. These athletes are only required to complete an ATUE form and submit it to the CCES if the athlete is selected for doping control and his/her sample returns an adverse analytical finding for a prohibited substance subject to the ATUE process. In such cases, the CCES will contact the athlete’s sport organization and the athlete will be required to complete and submit an ATUE form. ATUE forms received prior to doping control from domestic athletes will not be processed by the CCES. Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) athlete; Canadian Colleges Athletics Association (CCAA) athlete; (vi) Other athlete receiving direct or indirect financial assistance from a national sport organization or benefiting from any form of federal government subsidy; (vii) Other athlete member of any Canadian team participating in an international multi- (viii) Other athlete currently under suspension. ATUEs granted by the CCES are valid for the duration of the treatment as prescribed by the athlete’s physician up to a maximum of one year. Athletes will be provided with a Certificate of Approval from the CCES. It is the athlete’s responsibility to know when his/her ATUE expires and to apply for renewal, if necessary, before this date. The Canadian Anti-Doping Program – September 2006 Abbreviated Therapeutic Use Exemption Guidelines After reading the CADP, Section 5: TUE Rules, and these guidelines, an athlete requiring the use of a prohibited substance as a result of a medical physician’s diagnosis and prescription should: a) Determine if the prohibited substance is subject to the ATUE process as outlined in Item b) Identify his/her athlete category outlined in Item 3.3 of this guideline; and c) Review the following table to determine what action is required to meet ATUE Athlete Category (see Item 3.3)
Canadian
Registered Testing
International-Level
Domestic Athlete
Pool (RTP) Athlete
Athlete Who Is Not
in the RTP
Medical diagnosis
required prior to
taking the substance
ATUE form completed
by physician
ATUE form
submission
CCES Abbreviated Therapeutic Use Exemption Form

Source: http://warriorstherapy.uwaterloo.ca/forms/CCES-GL-ATUE-E%20testing%20TUE%20requirements.pdf

A-level human biology question paper unit 3 - pathogens and disease january 2009

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Evolution and Human Behavior 22 (2001) 61±69Second to fourth digit ratio and male ability in sport:implications for sexual selection in humansaPopulation and Evolutionary Biology Research Unit, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool,bFootball Research Unit, Department of History, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX, UKReceived 14 July 2000; accepted 16 October 2000

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