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Curriculum vitae

CURRICULUM VITAE
Harrison C. Spencer, MD, MPH, DTMH

Current Position:

President and CEO
Association of Schools of Public Health
1101 15th Street NW
Suite 910
Washington, DC 20005

Telephone, Fax & e-mail:

202-296-1099 (Office tel)
202-296-1252 (Office fax)
(e-mail)
Home Address

2425 L Street NW
Apt. 807
Washington, DC 20037
Education:

Haverford College, Haverford, PA
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD M.D. 1969 University of California School of Public Health, Berkeley, CA London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, England D.T.M&H. 1972

Professional Experience
2000-
President and CEO, Association of Schools of Public Health, Washington, DC 1996-2000: Dean, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, 1991-1995: Dean, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical 1987-1991: Chief, Parasitic Diseases Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, and 1984-1987: Senior Medical Officer, World Health Organisation, Geneva, 1979-1984: Senior Physician and Malaria Coordinator, Clinical Research Center, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya; Senior Lecturer, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nairobi Medical 1977-1979: Medical Officer, Bureau of Tropical Diseases, Centers for Disease 1975-1977: Medical Officer, Central America Research Station, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, San Salvador, El Salvador 1974-1975: Resident Internal Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 1972-1974: Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer (EIS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA 1970-1972: Resident, Medicine and Preventive Medicine, U.S.P.H.S., San Francisco, CA and University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA
1969-1970: Intern in Medicine, Vanderbilt University Hospital, Nashville, TN, USA
Medical License:
California
Board Certification:
Internal Medicine
Preventive Medicine
Academic Appointments:
Adjunct Professor, Departments of Epidemiology and International Health, George
Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Washington,
DC 2001-
Adjunct Professor, Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public
Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 2001-
Professor of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, London School of Hygiene &
Tropical Medicine, University of London, 1996-2000.
Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health
and Tropical Medicine, 1991-1996.
Adjunct Professor, Department of Tropical Medicine, Tulane University School of
Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 1996-

Professor, Department of Tropical Medicine, Tulane University School of Public
Health and Tropical Medicine, 1991-1996
Adjunct Professor, Department of Medicine, Tulane University Medical School, 1991-
1998.
Adjunct Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Morehouse School of
Medicine, 1988-1994.
Senior Lecturer, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nairobi, Nairobi,
Kenya, 1980-1984.
Honours
 Elected Member US Institute of Medicine 2003  Founding Fellow UK Academy of Medical Sciences 1999  Honorary Fellow UK Faculty of Public Health Medicine 1997  Honorary Vice President UK Royal Society for the Promotion of Health 1997-  Fellow American College of Physicians (FACP)  Fellow American College of Preventive Medicine (FACPM)  University of California-Berkeley School of Public Health Alumnus of the Year  Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine Champion of  U.S.P.H.S. Group Commendation Medal, 1991  U.S.P.H.S. Outstanding Service Medal, 1989
Committees and Boards:

 Paul G. Rogers Society for Global Health Research Advisory Council 2006-  Biodefense Council, Association of Academic Health Centers 2004-2006  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Futures Initiative Global  Research!America Scientific Advisory Board for Prevention Research 2002-  National Public Health Leadership Institute Advisory Board 2001-  Editorial Advisory Board, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2001-  Board of Scientific Advisors, National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC,  Carter Center International Task Force on Disease Eradication 1999-  Editorial Advisory Board, Emerging Infections, 1998-2002  Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals (This is the UK organisation of college and university presidents equivalents) 1996-2000  Health Committee 1998-2000  Research Policy Sector Group 1998-2000  General Medical Council (UK physicians regulatory body) 1996-2000  Professional Conduct Committee -GMC 1997-1998  Finance and Establishment Committee-GMC 1998-2000  Overseas Committee- GMC 1998-2000  Council of Deans and Heads of Medical Schools in the UK 1996-2000  Council (Board) of UK St George’s Medical School 1997-2000  Senate 1996-2000  Medical Studies Committee 1996-2000  Heads of Colleges Working Group 1996-2000  Postgraduate Medical and Dental Committee 1997-2000  Finance Working Group 1998-2000  London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine 1996-2000  Senior Management Team, Chair  Ethics Committee, Chair  School Council, Chair  Staff Review Committee, Chair  Senior Staff Review Committee  Board Finance and Planning Committee  Board of Management  Board Appeal Committee  International Clinical Epidemiology Network (INCLEN) Board 1997-2000  International Scientific Advisory Board, Chinese University Of Hong Kong  Senate  Chancellor’s Health Care Reform Task Force  Academic Affairs Committee  Senior Faculty Team, Chair  General Faculty  University Committee on Teaching Quality  Committee on Louisiana Health Care Reform, 1993-1995  Research Advisory Council, Louisiana Health Care Review, Inc., 1993-1995  Association of Schools of Public Health, 1991-1995  International Health Committee, Chair  Executive Committee  Councillor, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 1991-1995  Association of Academic Health Centers Health Promotion/Disease  Board, National Council International Health, 1992-1995  Board, Louisiana Bureau of Governmental Research, 1992-1995  WHO Committee on Research in Tuberculosis 1998  WHO Task Force on Malaria, Chair 1997  WHO Scientific Working Group on Chemotherapy of Malaria,  WHO Steering Committee on Field Research in Malaria, 1990-  WHO Scientific Working Group on Epidemiology 1987-1990  WHO Meeting on Field Trials of Health Interventions in  WHO Working Group on Severe and Complicated Malaria, Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) 2000-
Currently I am the first fulltime President and CEO of ASPH, the national
organization that represents the 37 US accredited schools of public health, the
Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico (which is accredited in the US) and 6
associate institutional members that are developing independent accredited schools.
I report to a Board and work very closely with the Chair of the Board. My
responsibilities include:
 Working with the Board to develop a strategic plan and strategic priorities  Developing implementation work plans and measurable outcomes for  Effectively managing staff and financial resources to ensure both financial and programmatic accountability ( ‘FY 2006 budget was $27 million)  Managing a large grants and contracts program for the schools of public health that included grants programs from foundations, government agencies and the private sector  Being the national spokesperson for academic public health in many different venues from Congress, federal and local government, universities, donors, the private sector, at public meetings and internationally  Articulating clearly complex academic public health issues and policies to  Raising the visibility and national and international profile of accredited  Effectively engaging partners including federal agencies (CDC, NIH, HRSA, AHRQ, EPA, IHS, etc), the public health community ( state and local health agencies and the American Public Health Association), the private sector and other non profit associations (particularly AAMC and APTR)  Coordinating a legislative strategy with schools and our legislative  Working effectively with foundations, government agencies and the private sector to increase resources for academic public health institutions and programs  Developing strategic alliances with the public health practice community  Initiating research and teaching programs in health disparities and
Major Accomplishments at ASPH 2000-2007 include:

 Strategic planning process initiated and completed  Major revision of by-laws and governance approved  Common application system for schools of public health students launched (public health only health profession without one)  National Board of Public Health Examiners (NBPHE) developed in partnership with partner organizations (APHA, ASTHO, NACCHO and APTR). .Beginning in 2008 the NBPHE will offer a credentialing exam for graduates of programs and schools of public health accredited by the Council on Education in Public Health-CEPH  Competencies for core curriculum and IOM cross cutting areas developed and  Major initiatives on diversity and health disparities done including the establishment of an ASPH health disparities and diversity resource center, the first ASPH minority faculty retreat, development of a minority doctoral fellowship program associated with the CDC prevention research centers, initiation of the Kellogg Foundation funded program on health disparities and formation of the Indian Health Service task force  Marketing initiative began and communication strategy developed  New undergraduate public health education task force initiated  New taskforce on workforce initiated to estimate projected need for graduates.  New initiative on academic health departments launched  Network of 33 academic centers for public health preparedness launched and  New fellowship programs with federal agencies EPA, CDC, HRSA, DoA,  Publication of the journal Public Health Reports undertaken
London 1996-2000:

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine is the national school of public
health of the UK and the only stand alone postgraduate medical school as well. A
recognised global center of excellence in research and teaching, it is the oldest (100
years in 1999) school of public health in the world, one of the 2 largest and the most
international. It is considered an independent college in the UK giving masters and
doctoral degrees and is rated by the government in the research assessment
exercise as one of the top research institutions. During my tenure, each year the
School had students from more than 100 countries, research and teaching programs
in more than 50 countries and academic faculty stationed in 15 countries.
Although part of the University of London in name, the School is essentially
independent as are the other 15 colleges because the University is federal and
exercises no real control over management. Funding decisions rest completely with
the individual institutions. The Dean is the CEO and reports to a Board of Management which has ultimate responsibility. The position of Dean is the equivalent therefore of a college president in the US and as such she/he is a member of the UK Committee of Vice Chancellors and Principals (CVCP). I was the first Dean not from the United Kingdom. My tenure at the School was marked by intensive, consultative, managed change as the School met new challenges and opportunities in a rapidly changing, increasingly competitive environment. I represented the School at numerous venues in the UK, Europe and globally. I worked closely with the Board of Management and its Chair as well as with the Finance Committee. Major milestones 1996-2000 include:  Initiated school-wide consultation and strategic planning process resulting in  Initiation of the first Appeal (Development) Campaign in the School’s history. Plan prepared and approved by Board for £10 million (about $16 million USD) and appeal officer recruited. About $45 million USD including a major gift from the Gates Foundation was achieved in the first 3 years of the Campaign.  Incorporation of a 501 (3) in the US- The American Friends of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine for development activities  Led School-wide, multidisciplinary research strategic planning process resulting in departmental research strategies. Research income increased significantly.  Strategy developed and implemented for recruitment of students resulting in and increase of more than 100 MSc student and 30+ doctoral resident students, the meeting of targets for the first time and an increase in applications of more than 15%. The School remains highly selective, possibly the most selective institution of its kind.  Development of distance-based learning with 3 MSc degrees (management, infectious diseases and epidemiology) now offered with more than 800 students enrolled from more than 100 countries  Development of an investment strategy and contract to professional group to manage portfolio in excess of £14 million (about $22 million USD)  Doctorate of Public Health (DrPH) and 4 new masters degrees initiated  Short and medium term space strategy with business plan developed and approved by Board. New premises leased and refurbished and major renovations undertaken in other buildings.  Reserves (the equivalent of endowment and funds functioning as endowment) increased by about £7 million ( about $11 million USD)
Tulane 1991-1995
Tulane is one of the most international US schools of public health. It is the only one
with departments of tropical medicine and international health and development.
(The latter department was created while I was dean). During this time, student
numbers more than doubled, faculty numbers grew from the 40’s to almost 100,
research income (particularly NIH funding) more than doubled, a successful capital
campaign was carried out, endowment grew, Humphrey Fellows and Peace Corps
programs were continued and expanded, the number of international programs and
students increased dramatically and strong collaborations and partnerships were
created with other schools including medicine, law, business, engineering, and social
work. Joint degree programs (MD/MPH, MBA/MPH,etc) were strengthened. A new
continuing education and degree program for the Association of Physician
Executives was begun.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1987-1991
As Chief of the Parasitic Diseases Branch, I managed more that 100 personnel
including bench scientists, vector control experts, chemists, water experts,
epidemiologists, bio-statisticians, behavioural scientists, EIS officers, technologists
and support staff working on parasitic diseases. The Branch had a number of global
health programs including ones in Egypt, Kenyaand Peru.

World Health Organization 1984-1987
I was senior medical officer with the malaria action programme. I managed an
ambitious programme of malaria control targeted to 3 countries in the WHO African
Region (Togo, Zambia and Cameroon) and 3 in the WHO Western Pacific Region
(Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, and Papua New Guinea). I worked closely with WHO
and local government officials as well as with communities in malaria endemic areas.
Most of my time was spent in these 6 countries. In 1983 and 1984, at the invitation
of Jonathon Mann, then director, I worked with the developing WHO program on
HIV/AIDS. They had few permanent staff. I made visits to African countries to help
the government carry out assessments and prepare plans to address this
devastating public health epidemic.
Kenya 1979-1984
In Kenya, I was a senior lecturer teaching in the Department of Community Medicine,
University of Nairobi. I was also the senior physician and malaria coordinator for the
Kenya Medical Research Institute with responsibility for laboratory and field studies.
I was also a physician in the Clinical Research Centre providing medical care.

The main focus of my time in Kenya was the Saradidi Rural Health Development
Program, a research, teaching and service program based at Saradidi, a community
of about 50,000 people in western Kenya, on the shores of Lake Victoria near
Kisumu. Mentored by Dr Dan Kaseje, the Kenya senior project leader, I worked with
him to train a network of community health volunteers that would provide medical
and preventive services directly to people living in their village. We documented the
formation of the network, monitored demographic trend, collected morbidity and
mortality data and conducted epidemiological and behavioural studies. We worked
in full partnership with the people of Saradidi who maintained control of the program
throughout.

Publications:


SEXTON DJ, KROGSTAD DJ, SPENCER HC, HEALY GR,. SINCLAIR S, SLEDGE
CE, SCHULTZ MG.
Amoebiasis in a mental institution: serologic and epidemiologic
studies. Am.J.Epid. 100:414-423, 1974.
BRODSKY RE, SPENCER HC, SCHULTZ MG. Giardiasis in American travelers to
the Soviet Union, J.Inf.Dis. 130:319-323, 1974.
SPENCER HC, GIBSON JJ, BRODSKY RE, SCHULTZ MG. Imported African
trypanosomiasis in the U.S. Ann.Int.Med. 82:633-638, 1975.
MEYERS JD, SPENCER HC, GREGG MB, STEWARD JA, TROUPIN RH,
THOMAS ED.
Cytomegalovirus pneumonia after human marrow transplantation.
Ann.Int.Med. 82:181-185, 1975.

SPENCER HC, HERMOS JA, HEALY GR, MELVIN DM, SHMUNES E.
Endemic
amoebiasis in an Arkansas community. Am.J.Epid. 104:93-99, 1976.
WRIGHT RA, SPENCER HC, BRODSKY RE, VERNON TM. Giardiasis in Colorado.
Am.J.Epid. 105:330-336, 1977.
SPENCER HC, CAMPBELL CC, ROMERO A, ZEISSIG O, FELDMAN RA,
BOOSTROM ER, LONG EC.
Disease surveillance and decision making after the
1976 Guatemala earthquake. Lancet 2:181-184, 1977.
SPENCER HC, MUCHNICK C, SEXTON DJ, DODSON P, WALLS KW. Endemic
amoebiasis in an extended family. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 26:628-635, 1977.
SPENCER HC, MILLER CH, COLLINS WE, KNUD-HANSEN C, MCGINNIS MH,
SHIROISHI T, LOBOS RA, FELDMAN RA.
The Duffy blood group factor and
resistance to P.vivax in Honduras. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 27:664-670, 1978.
KROGSTAD DJ, SPENCER HC, HEALY GR, GLEASON NN, SEXTON DJ,
HERRON CA.
Amoebiasis: Epidemiologic studies in the United States, 1971-1974.
Ann.Int.Med. 88:89-97, 1978.
KROGSTAD DJ, SPENCER HC, HEALY GR. Amoebiasis. N.E.J.Med. 298:262-
265, 1978.
SPENCER HC, COLLINS WE, CHIN W, SKINNER J. The enzyme-linked
immunosorbent assay for malaria II. Comparison with the indirect fluorescent
antibody test. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 28:933-936, 1979.
SPENCER HC, ALLAIN DS, SULZER AJ, COLLINS WE. Evaluation of the ELISA
for antibodies to T.cruzi. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 29:179-182, 1980.
SPENCER HC, WELLS JG, GARY GW, SONDY J, PUHR ND, FELDMAN RA.
Diarrhea in a non-hospitalized rural El Salvador population. The role of
enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and rotavirus. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 29:246-253,
1980.

MATHEWS HM, SPENCER HC, HEALY GR. Comparison of the IHA test for
amoebiasis on serum and filter paper specimens. Trans.Roy.Soc.Trop.Med.Hyg.
74:404-405, 1980.
CAMPBELL CC, SPENCER HC, CHIN W, COLLINS WE. Adaptation of cultured
Plasmodium falciparum to the intact squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus).
Trans.Roy.Soc.Trop.Med.Hyg. 74:548-549, 1980.
SPENCER HC, COLLINS WE, STANFILL PS, HUONG AY, BARBER AM,
CONTACOS PG.
Antibody responses to heterologous and homologous antigents in
Brugia malayi and B.pahangi-infected mongolian jirds as measured by the ELISA.
Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 30:358-363, 1981.
SPENCER HC, SULLIVAN JJ, MATHEWS HM, SAUERBREY M, BLOCH M, CHIN
W, HEALY GR.
Serologic and parasitologic studies of Entamoeba histolytic in El
Salvador 1974-1978. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 30:63-68. 1981.
SPENCER HC, COLLINS WE, WARREN McW, JEFFEREY GM, MASON J,
HUONG AY, STANFILL PS, SKINNER JC.
The ELISA for malaria III. Antibody
response in documented Plasmodium falciparum infections. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg.
30:747-750, 1981.
MASABA SC, SPENCER HC. Sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine
in Busia District, Kenya. Trans.Roy.Soc.Trop.Med.Hyg. 76:314-316, 1982.
SPENCER HC, MASABA SC, KIARAHO D. Sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum
isolates to chloroquine in Kisumu and Malandi, Kenya. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 31:902-
906, 1982.

NGUYEN-DINH P, SPENCER HC, MASABA SC, CHURCHILL FC. Susceptibility of
Plasmodium falciparum to pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine in Kisumu,
Kenya. Lancet 1:823-825, 1982.
SPENCER HC, KIPENGOR T, AGURE R, KOECH DC, CHULAY JD. Plasmodium
falciparum
in Kisumu, Kenya: differences in vitro sensitivity to amodiaquina and
chloroquine in vitro. J.Inf.Dis. 148:732-736, 1983

CHULAY JD, SPENCER HC, WARSHOW MM, SAIO MA, MUSOKE SS,
MASEMBE JB, MASON LW, ROLLINS AJ, CHURCHILL FC.
Chloroquine-
resistant falciparum malaria. N.E.J.Med. 308:781, 1983.
SPENCER HC, MASABA SC, CHULAY JD, NGUYEN-DINH P. Field evaluation in
Kenya of a 48 hour in vitro test for Plasmodium falciparum sensitivity to chloroquine.
Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 32:916-921, 1983.
SPENCER HC, KARIUKI DM, KOECH DK. In vivo and vitro chloroquine resistance
in Plasmodium falciparum from Kenyan infants. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 32:922-925,
1983.

SPENCER HC, KASEJE DCO, KOECH DK. The Kenyan Saradidi Community
Malaria Project :1. Sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum isolates to chloroquine in
1981 and 1982. Trans.Roy.Soc.Trop.Med.Hyg. 77:645-649, 1983.
SIXSMITH DG, SPENCER HC, WATKINS WM, KOECH DK, CHULAY JD.
Changing response to chloroquine of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. Lancet 2:1022,
1983.
WATKINS WM, SIXSMITH DG, SPENCER HC, BORIGA DA, KARIUKI DM,
KIPENGOR T, KOECH DK.
Effectiveness of amodiaquine as treatment for
chloroquine - resistant Plasmodium falciparum infections in Kenya. Lancet 1:357-359,
1984.
SPENCER HC, OLOO AJ, WATKINS WM, SIXSMITH DG, CHURCHILL FC,
KOECH DK.
Amodiaquine is more effective than chloroquine against Plasmodium
falciparum
malaria on the Kenya coast. Lancet 1:956, 1984.
SIXSMITH DG, WATKINS WM, CHULAY JD, SPENCER HC. In vitro antimalarial
activity of tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase inhibitors. Amer.J.Trop.Med.hyg. 33:772-
776, 1984.
SPENCER HC, WATKINS WM, SIXSMITH OG, KOECH DK, CHULAY JD. A new
in vitro test for pyrimethamine/sulfadoxine susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum
and its correlation with in vivo resistance in Kenya. Bull. W.H.O. 62:615-621, 1984.

CHUNGE CN, GACHIHI G, CHULAY JD, SPENCER HC.
Complications of kala-
azar and its treatment in Kenya. East Afr.Med.J. 61:120-127, 1984.
WARREN Mc, SPENCER HC, CHURCHILL FC, FRANCOIS VJ, HIPPOLYTE R,
STAIGER MA.
Assessment of exposure to organophosphate insecticides from
malaria - control spraying in Haiti: Monitoring of urinary metabolite and blood
cholinesterase levels. Bull. W.H.O. 63:353-360, 1985.
CHULAY JD, SPENCER HC, MUGAMBI M. Electrocardiographic changes during
treatment of leishmaniasis with pentavalent antimony (sodium stibogluconate).
Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 34:702-709, 1985.

SPENCER HC, SIXSMITH DG, WATKINS WM, KOECH DK, CHULAY JD.
In vitro
response of Kenyan Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine in different media.
Trans.Roy.Soc.Trop.Med.Hyg. 79:116-118, 1985.
BRYCESON ADM, CHULAY JD, MUGAMBI M, WERE JB, GACHIHI G, CHUNGE
CN, MUIGAR, BHATT SM, HO M, SPENCER HC, MEME J, ANABWANI G.

Visceral leishmaniasis unresponsive to antimonial drugs. II. Response to high
dosage sodium stibogulconate or prolonged treatment with pentamidine.
Trans.Roy.Soc.Trop.Med.Hyg. 79:705-714, 1985.
SPENCER HC. Drug-resistant malaria: changing patterns means difficult decisions.
Trans.Roy.Soc.Trop.Med.Hyg. 79:748-758, 1985.
SPENCER HC, POULTER NR, LURY SD, POULTER CJ. Chloroquine-associated
pruritus in Europeans. Brit.Med.J. 285:1703-1985.
WATKINS WM, SIXSMITH DG, CHULAY JD, SPENCER HC. Antagonism of
sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine antimalarial activity in vitro by p.aminobenzoic acid,
p-amino-benzoylglutamic acid and folic acid. Molec.Biochem.Parasitol. 14:55-61,
1983.
SPENCER HC, WATKINS WM, SIXSMITH DG, KOECH DK. Response of
Plasmodium falciparum to dihydrate folate reductase inhibitors in Malindi, Kenya.
Trans.Roy.Soc.Trop.Med.Hyg. 80:201-203, 1986.
KASEJE DCO, SPENCER HC. The Saradidi, Kenya, Rural Health Development
Programme. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol. 81 (Suppl.1):1-12, 1987.
SPENCER HC, KASEJE DCO, COLLINS WE, SHEHATA MG, TURNER A,
STANFILL PS, HUONG AY, ROBERTS JM, VILLINSKI M.
Community-based
malaria control in Saradidi, Kenya: description of the programme and impact on
parasitemia rates and antimalarial antibodies. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol. 81 (Suppl.1)
13-23, 1987.
SPENCER HC, KASEJE DCO, SEMPEBWA EK, HUONG AY, ROBERTS JM,
MOSLEY WH.
The Saradidi, Kenya, Rural Health Development Programme:
retrospective demographic analysis: Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol. 81 (Suppl.1): 24-35,
1987.
SPENCER HC, KASEJE DCO, MOSELY WH, SEMPEBWA EKN, HUONG AY,
ROBERTS JM.
Impact on mortality and fertility of a community-based malaria
control programme in Saradidi, Kenya. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol. 81 (Suppl.1):36-45,
1987.
KASEJE DCO, SEMPEBWA EKN, SPENCER HC. Community leadership and
participation in the Saradidi, Kenya Rural Health Development Programme.
Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol. 81 (Suppl.1):46-55, 1987.

KASEJE DCO, SPENCER HC, SEMPEBWA EKN.
Characteristics and functions of
community health workers in Saradidi, Kenya. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol.81
(Suppl.1):56-66, 1987.
KASEJE MA, KASEJE DCO, SPENCER HC. The training process in community-
based health care in Saradidi, Kenya. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol. 81(Suppl.1):67-76,
1987.
KASEJE DCO, SEMPEWA EKN, SPENCER HC. Malaria chemoprophylaxis to
pregnant women provided by community health workers in Saradidi, Kenya. I.
Reasons for non acceptance. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol. 81 (Suppl.1):77-82, 1987.
SPENCER HC, KASEJE DCO, SEMPEBWA EKN, HUONG AY, ROBERTS JM.
Malaria chemoprophylaxis to pregnant women provided by community health
workers in Saradidi, Kenya. II. Effect on parasitemia and hemoglobin levels.
Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol. 81 (Suppl.1): 83-89, 1987.
COLLINS WE, SPENCER HC, KASEJE DCO, SHEHATA MG, TURNER A,
HUONG AY, STANFILL PS, ROBERTS JM.
Malaria chemoprophylaxis to pregnant
women provided by community health workers in Saradidi, Kenya. III. Serologic
studies. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol. 81 (Suppl.1):90-97, 1987.
MBURU FM, SPENCER HC, KASEJE DCO. Changes in sources of treatment
occurring after inception of a community-based malaria control programme in
Saradidi, Kenya. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol. 81 (Suppl.1):105-110, 1987.
KASEJE DCO, SPENCER HC, SEMPEBWA EKN. Usage of community-based
chloroquine treatment for malaria in Saradidi, Kenya. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol.81
(Suppl.1):111-115, 1987.
SPENCER HC, KASEJE DCO, ROBERTS JM, HUONG JM. Consumption of
chloroquine phosphate provided for treatment of malaria by volunteer village health
workers in Saradidi, Kenya. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol.81 (Suppl.1):116-123, 1987.
SPENCER HC, KASEJE DCO, BRANDLING-BENNETT AD, OLOO AJ, WATKINS
WM.
Epidemiology of chloroquine-associated pruritus in Saradidi, Kenya.
Ann.Trop.Med.Paraitol.81 (Suppl.1):124-127, 1987.
SPENCER HC, KASEJE DCO, ROBERTS JM, HUONG AY. Symptoms associated
with common diseases in Saradidi, Kenya. Ann.Trop.Med.Parasitol.81
(Suppl.1):128-134, 1987.
KASEJE DCO, SEMPEBWA EKN, SPENCER HC. Community-based distribution
of family planning services in Saradidi, Kenya. Ann.Trop.Med.Paraditol.81
(Suppl.1):135-143, 1987.

WATKINS WM, CHULAY JD, SIXSMITH DG, SPENCER HC, HOWELLS RE.
A
preliminary pharmacokinetic study of the antimalarial drugs proguanil and
chlorproguanil. J.Pharm.Pharmacol. 39:261-265, 1987.
RICHARDS FO, MCNEELEY MB, BRYAN RT, EBERHARD ML, LAMMIE PJ,
SPENCER HC.
Absence of abnormal clotting in filariasis patients treated with
ivermectin. Lancet 1:1139-1140, 1989.
SPENCER HC, RUIZ-TIBEN, CLINE BC. Evaluation of a UNICEF/Government of
Egypt/WHO Schistosomiasis Control Project in Beheira Governorate, Egypt.
Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 42:441-448, 1990.
BRYAN RT, STOKES SL, SPENCER HC. Expatriates treated with ivermectin.
Lancet 337(8736):304-5, 1991.
RICHARDS FO, MCNEELEY D, BRYAN RT, EBERHARD ML, MCNEELEY M,
LAMMIE P, BERNARD Y, SPENCER HC.
Comparison of high dose invermectin
and diethylcarbamazine for activity against bancroftian filariasis in Haiti.
Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 44:3-10, 1991.
ADDISS DG, EBERHARD ML, LAMMIE PJ, HITCH WL, SPENCER HC. Tolerance
of single high-dose ivermectin for treatment of lymphatic filariasis.
Trans.Roy.Soc.Trop.Med.Hyg. 85:265-266, 1991.
ADDISS DG, JURANEK DD, SPENCER HC. Treatment of children with
asymptomatic and nondiarrheal Giardia infection. Pediatr.Infect.Dis.J.10 (11): 843-6;
discussion 846-8, 1991.
ADDISS DG, STEWART JM, FINTON RJ, WAHLQUIST SP, WILLIAMS RM,
DICKERSON JW, SPENCER HC, JURANEK DD.
Giardia lamblia and
Cryptosporidium infections in child day-care centers in Fulton County, Georgia.
Pediatr.Infect.Dis.J. 10(12):907-11, 1991.
BRYAN RT, CALI A, OWEN RL, SPENCER HC. Microsporidia: opportunistic
pathogens in patients with AIDS. Prog.Clin.Parasitol, 2:1-26, 1991.
ADDISS DG, MATHEWS HM, STEWART JM, WAHLQUIST SP, WILLIAMS RM,
FINTON RJ, SPENCER HC, JURANEK DD.
Evaluation of a commercially available
enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Giardia lamblia antigen in stool.
J.Clin.Microbiol, 29(6):1137-42, 1991.
WEBER R, BRYAN RT, OWEN RL, WILCOX CM, GORELKIN L, VISVESVARA
GS, JURANEK DD, ADDISS DG, SPENCER HC, HIGHTOWER AW, STEWART
JM, ROBERTS JM, WAHLQUIST SP, HORSBURGH CR, CASTRO KG, TAUXE
RV, VUGIA DJ, GLASS RI, THOMPSON SE, SCHWARTZ DA, KOZARSKY PE,
STEINBERG JP, SHULMAN JA, DISMUKES RM, DUPUIS MH, NICKERSON JF,
RIMLAND D, HOGAN SE, JOHNSON A, ELLIOTT N.
Improved light-microscopic
detection of microsporidia spores in stool and duodenal aspirates. New.Eng.J.Med.
326 (3):161-166, 1992

THACKER SB, ADDISS DG, GOODMAN RA, HOLLOWAY BR, SPENCER HC.

Infectious diseases and injuries in child day care: Opportunities for healthier children.
J.A.M.A. 13:1720-1726, 1992.
LAMMIE PJ, HIGHTOWER AW, RICHARDS FO, BRYAN RT, SPENCER HC,
MCNEELEY DF, MCNEELEY MB, EBERHARD ML.
Alterations in filarial antigen
specific/immunologic reactivity following treatment with ivermectin and
diethylcarbamazine. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 46:292-295, 1992.
SPENCER HC. Tropical Medicine at Tulane University: Back to the Future.
Trop.Med.34:171-172, 1992.
SOLOMONS HC, ELARDO R, THACKER SB, ADDISS DG, GOODMAN RA,
HOLLOWAY BR, SPENCER HC.
Rates of injury at day care centres.
J.Amer.Med.Assoc. 269:2734-2735, 1993.
MICHELSON MS, ABDEL AZZIZ F, GAMIL FM, WAHID AA, RICHARDS FO,
JURANEK D, HABIB MA, SPENCER HC.
Recent trends in the prevalence and
distribution of schistosomiasis in the Nile Delta Region. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 49:76-
87, 1993.
ADDISS DG, EBERHARD ML, LAMMIE PJ, MCNEILEY MB, LEE SH, MCNEILEY
DF, SPENCER HC.
Comparative efficacy of clearing dose and single dose of
invermectin and diethylcarbamazine against Wuchereria bancroft: microfilaremia.
Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 48:178-185, 1993.
THACKER SB, ADDISS DG, GOODMAN RA, HOLLOWAY BR, SPENCER HC.
Rates of injury at day-care centres - reply. JAMA 269(21):2734-2735, 1993.
KAPPUS KD, LUNDGREN RG, JURANEK DD, ROBERTS JM, SPENCER HC.
Intestinal parasitism in the United States: Update on a continuing problem.
Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 50:705-713, 1994.
SPENCER HC. Perspectives of Public Health and Prevention. Am.J.Med.Sci.
310(Suppl.1):S83-S85, 1995.
Working paper:
NGUYEN-DINH P, MASABA SC, SPENCER HC, CAMPBELL CC, CHIN W,
COLLINS WE.
Comparative studies on the cryopreservation of malaria parasites.
WHO/MAL/81:941, 1981.

Chapters:
SPENCER HC.
African trypanosomiasis. In: Hunters Tropical Medicine 6th Edition,
STRICKLAND GT, editor, W.B.Saunders, Philadelphia, 1983.
SPENCER HC, STRICKLAND GT. Malaria In: Hunters Tropical Medicine 6th
Edition, STRICKLAND GT, editor, W.B.Saunders, Philadelphia, 1983.
MOLINEAUX L, MUIR DA, SPENCER HC, WERNSDORFER WH. The
epidemiology of malaria and its measurement. In: Wernsdorfer WH, McGregor
Principles and Practices of Malariology. Churchill Livingston, New York, 1988,
SPENCER HC. Dracunculiasis. In: Hunter Tropical Medicine 7th Edition.
STRICKLAND GT, Editor, W.B.Saunders, Philadelphia, 1989.
HERWALDT BL, SPENCER HC. Amoebiasis. In: Rakel RE, editor. Conns Current
Therapy, W.B.Saunders, Philadelphia, 1992, pp.44-46.

Source: http://www.epi.org.tw/doc/CV.pdf

Geo.de - neurologie: wie der bauch den kopf bestimmt

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